JJS Technical Services Blog

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Update on Eve (Now Evie)

Posted April 2nd, 2014 by Administrator

 

 

We are happy to announce that Eve has found her forever home.  This is from Casey’s:

 

 

From an unwanted dog dumped by her owners at a dump site, full of sarcoptic mange, just had babies, and heartworm positve. She has transformed into the most beautiful dog. After she was fostered through the contagious 2 weeks of sarcoptic mange from a wonderful family in Kentucky we finally got Eve here on January 22nd and spent 5 weeks with our wonderful foster Sarah who nursed her back to health. At the end of February Diane and her husband Dan wanted to foster to adopt Eve and help her through the heartworm treatment. Which they have. On March 29th. Diane and Dan will officially adopt her. She doesn’t even look like the same dog.

 

 

This is from her new mom:
All of you have no idea how much joy and love she has brought to our hearts. She has adjusted very well here. She loves car rides and also playing in the back yard. Her favorite thing is watching the price is right in her very own recliner. We cannot wait to officially adopt her and give her her new name of Evie Grace Gioia. Because of everyone who helped her through everything she went through she has turned out to be the sweetest most lovable little doggie. At the end of April she will be taking her first road trip to Minnesota to meet her grandparents so she can be spoiled even more. Thank you and God bless each and everyone of you for what you do.
Love Dan, Diane and Evie Grace Gioia.

 

 

Everyone at JJS is very happy that Evie has found her forever home and will now have the life and love that she deserves.
 

 

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Abandoned by her owners and rescued on Christmas Eve, Eve is now searching for her forever home

Posted February 4th, 2014 by jon.frodin@jjstech.com

One of the wonderful things that we are able to do at JJS Technical Services is to give back to our community. This year we have partnered with Casey’s Safe Haven, a dog and horse rescue located in Elburn, Illinois, to sponsor the care of a special dog every month until he or she can be adopted by a caring, loving, and committed family or individual. Casey’s Safe Haven is dedicated to the rescue and placement of dogs and puppies that have been neglected, abandoned or surrendered when their owners are no longer able to care for them.

 

You can view Eve directly at: http://caseysdogrescue.com/dog-month/.

 

 

We will post one blog a month featuring the special dog that we are sponsoring. It is our hope in bringing the plight of these dogs to your attention that we can work together to find them all a loving home they can call their own. The dogs that we sponsor will be medically treated and healthy when they are eligible to be adopted and all they need is love, attention and a chance at a new life with a caring, loving family.

 


Our first dog is a beautiful natured, gentle and very friendly black Labrador Retriever that we were privileged to name Eve. Although her exact age is unknown the knowledgeable staff at Casey’s and the vet estimate that she is between 2 and 3 years of age. She is extremely well trained, obedient and loves to be with people. She enjoys going for rides in the car, works well on a leash and knows all the basic commands, showing she was a loved and cared for dog in her past.

 

Eve was found abandoned at a donation collection site by some kind people this Christmas. They immediately recognized the plight of this poor animal as she was hopefully waiting there for an owner that would never return. All she had was a half a bag of dog food and an old collar around her neck. She was obviously a new mother dog although no puppies were left with her and none were found in the surrounding area.

 

 

She was taken to Casey’s Safe Haven where the first order of business was a trip to the vet. It was determined that she had mange, a secondary skin infection, worms, ear infection, and she was also found to be heartworm positive. Currently she is finishing her mange treatment and is getting her beautiful coat back in shape. She has been wormed, spayed, vaccinated and micro-chipped and all infections are fully treated.

 

 

Eve is now in a foster home where she is a playful, loving and happy member of the family. She will start heartworm treatment in the next few weeks and, if all goes as planned, Eve will be ready for adoption to a forever home on March 17, 2014.

 

If you are interested in learning more about Eve please contact Casey’s Safe Haven online at http://caseysdogrescue.com/. For more information about Eve click on the Special Needs Dogs header and check out the January Dog of the Month post. If you want to help get the word out please spread the story of Eve and let’s find her the forever home she truly deserves.

 

 

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Next Generation of GX-2003

Posted October 26th, 2012 by Administrator

More Features, Lower Prices

RKI Instruments is pleased to announce our latest advancement in portable instrumentation, model GX-2012, and compatible calibration station. The GX-2012 has more features than the GX-2003 at a much lower price tag.

What’s the Difference?

The standard 4-gas GX-2003 alkaline version has a list price of $1,270. An alkaline, 4-gas GX-2012 has a list price of only $995.

Both units have a strong internal sample draw pump and both use the same 4-gas sensors, however, the GX-2012 also has a high-impact weather proof design, more battery options, lower PPM CH4 range (Gas Tracer), and larger display.

 

 

SDM-2012 – Calibration Station

Our docking station with digital display for the GX-2012 allows for effortless maintenance and record keeping.  The SDM-2012 has two gas inlets making calibration set up using multiple gas cylinders much easier. It can be used as a stand alone station or connected to a PC for multi-station use and archiving data to network location.

 

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Last day to purchase Gas Alert Micro parts

Posted September 27th, 2012 by Administrator

September 28 is the last day to purchase parts for the Gas Alert Micro. Customers that are in need of parts or who want to stock up are advised to order by the end of day September 28. After this date parts will no longer be available for the Gas Alert Micro. The successor to the Gas Alert Micro is the Gas Alert Quattro and Gas Alert Micro clip XT.

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New Probe for Eagle and Eagle 2

Posted September 17th, 2012 by Administrator

Effective this week, RKI will start shipping a new and improved sample probe for our EAGLE and EAGLE 2 gas monitors. The new probe has several improved features over the old probe.

Improvements

 

More ergonomic design
Fits better in your hand or glove.

Compatibility
Uses the same paper dust/hydrophobic filter disc as well as the removable probe tip of original Eagle probes.

Visibility
Probe body is clear, making it easy to see condition of filters.

Flow Integrity
The new probe has 2 larger o-rings to improve seal points. Even if you forget to install the paper dust filter, it will seal and allow only sample from the probe tip to enter the instrument.

Additional filter

The new probe contains a second and more porous polypropylene dust filter cup, which will filter dirt and dust. With this extra dust filter cup, the new probe’s hydrophobic filter disc can be better utilized for filtering moisture and fine dust. The part numbers for the new and old probes are as follows:

Part Number Description
80-0131RK-10 Probe, 10”, hydrophobic, standard, with particle filter and metal fittings, Eagle / Eagle 2
80-0131RK-20 Probe, 10”, hydrophobic, standard, with metal fittings, without particle filter for Eagle 2 with PID
80-0132RK-10
Probe, 10”, hydrophobic, without particle filter, with plastic fittings for toxic gas versions
(HCL/CLO2/etc), Eagle/Eagle 2
80-0133RK-10 Probe, 30”, aluminum, with particle filter and 1641 fittings, EAGLE
80-0134RK-10 Probe, 4′, stainless steel, with particle filter, handle, and 1641 fittings, EAGLE
80-0135RK-10 Probe, 30”, stainless steel, with particle filter and 1641 fittings, EAGLE
80-0142RK-10 Probe, 30”, fiberglass, for bar hole, with particle filter, EAGLE
80-0156RK-10 Probe, 30”, fiberglass, rigid with particle filter, Eagle

 

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SDM-2009 Calibration Station Now Shipping

Posted September 13th, 2012 by Administrator

SDM-2009 Now Shipping

RKI’s new SDM-2009 calibration station for the GX-2009 is now available with advanced features for charging, calibration, & bump testing. Once you power up the GX-2009 inside the SDM-2009 calibration module, the GX-2009’s display will indicate whether it’s transmitting data, bump testing, calibrating, as well as the results of the bump test or calibration.

Multi Module System
The SDM-2009 can also be connected to a PC for automated calibration, bump testing, and archiving of logged data including calibration and bump test records, interval and alarm trends.

Network up to 10 SDM-2009 stations to charge, calibrate, and bump test 10 instruments simultaneously.

User Guide Poster
Each SDM-2009 ships with a pictorial wall chart user guide. This guide gives the already easy to use cal station a simple pictorial easy step by step guide to calibrating or bump testing a GX-2009. It’s ideal to hang in an instrument shop or wherever the GX-2009 is located.

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Inert Atmosphere Gas Monitor Now Available

Posted September 11th, 2012 by Administrator


Inert Eagle 2

EAGLE 2 with Inert Mode

The Eagle 2 with Inert Mode option is designed to operate within inert environments such as catalyst operations in refineries. An Eagle 2 with Inert Mode can be configured with sensors for LEL/CO/O2/H2S.  The LEL sensor is an Infrared sensor that measures 0-100% LEL and does not require oxygen to operate, unlike a traditional catalytic sensor which does require oxygen.  The CO sensor is used as a dual sensor to detect both CO and H2 (5 % LEL H2 = 100 PPM CO).

The instrument can be changed from Normal Mode to Inert Mode by simply pressing the Range/Shift button on the front display panel.  The Oxygen alarm points are reversed in Inert mode to alarm on increasing. The factory setting is to alarm on 5% O2 increasing and is programmable.

RKI’s new Eagle 2 Inert Monitor has the ability to monitor for rising O2 concentrations, combustible gases, and toxic gases H2S and CO. With its powerful pump, the Eagle 2 can be used with up to a 125’ hose, allowing the meter to stay with the hole attendant while monitoring the working conditions inside the cracking unit.

Inert Atmosphere
Inert atmospheres are created when oxygen is displaced by an inert gas, and often a high concentration of explosive gas may be present. An example of an inert atmosphere is the nitrogen purged catalyst units at refineries. When workers perform any catalyst handling functions in the reactors, special precautions are taken for their inert entry.

Advanced Features of Eagle 2
The Eagle 2 has the sensor technology needed for inert entry and is designed to withstand the extreme conditions surrounding the catalyst operations.

A dust filter is used in the probe tip to accommodate for fine catalyst dust.

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RKI SDM-2012 Calibration Station Now Shipping

Posted September 11th, 2012 by Administrator

SDM-2012 from RKI Instruments

RKI’s new SDM-2012 calibration station for the GX-2012 is now available with advanced features for charging, calibration, & bump testing. Once you power up the GX-2012 inside the SDM-2012 calibration module, the GX-2012’s display will indicate whether it’s transmitting data, bump testing, calibrating, as well as the results of the bump test or calibration.

Multi Module System
The SDM-2012 can also be connected to a PC for automated calibration, bump testing, and archiving of logged data including calibration and bump test records, interval and alarm trends. Network up to 10 SDM-2012 stations to charge, calibrate, and bump test 10 instruments simultaneously.

User Guide Poster
Each SDM-2012 ships with a pictorial wall chart user guide. This guide gives the already easy to use cal station a simple pictorial easy step by step guide to calibrating or bump testing a GX-2012. It’s ideal to hang in an instrument shop or wherever the GX-2012 is located.

 

 

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RKI Instruments introduces the EAGLE 2, Six Gas Sample Drawing Monitor

Posted September 16th, 2010 by Administrator

EAGLE 2, Six Gas Sample Drawing Monitor.

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How often to calibrate

Posted September 15th, 2010 by Administrator

Improper calibration and irregular service can render your gas monitors useless.
The news reports are all too frequent. Every year several workers die in gas related accidents. Many of these could have been prevented through the use of a properly calibrated and maintained gas detection instrument. Confusion often surrounds gas monitors, which are a technical piece of equipment often operated by non-technical personnel. Operators are often unaware of calibration requirements and many instruments are used until they either don’t function or are in continuous alarm. In addition to the tragic consequences of death and severe injury, are the steep fines and penalties imposed by OSHA, and the subsequent costly lawsuits filed after the accident. For example, in 2002 OSHA fined a paper mill $91,000 after two workers were killed and eight others injured after being overcome by Hydrogen Sulfide gas. A basic understanding of calibration procedures and top-level maintenance issues can save your company from costly fines and lawsuits and most importantly keep your workers safe.

Calibration Frequency

So what is the proper frequency of calibration? This has been a gray area for many years and has helped contribute to the confusion surrounding calibration. Prior to May 2004 OSHA had never made a recommendation on calibration frequency, only stating that a properly calibrated instrument must be used when there is the potential for harmful gas in a working environment. This vague mandate left it up to the manufacturers to decide what properly calibrated meant. Some manufacturers stated every 30 days and others recommended as much as 180 days. This made it all the more confusing if you had monitors from several different manufacturers. However, in 2004 OSHA published a bulletin in which the ISEA(International Safety Equipment Association) issued a position statement clarifying some confusions surrounding calibration.

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